Design, Monitoring and Evaluation for Peacebuilding

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How to Monitor and Evaluate Lobbying and Advocacy Efforts: Insights from the GPPAC

On April 16, 2015, the Network for Peacebuilding Evaluation and the Peacebuilding Evaluation Consortium were pleased to have hosted a Thursday Talk with Paul Kosterink of the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC), who discussed how the GPPAC uses Outcome Mapping to monitor and evaluate its progress in its advocacy and lobbying efforts.

The Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) is a member-led network of civil society organizations (CSOs) from around the world that are active in the conflict prevention and peacebuilding field.  GPPAC’s mission is to create a fundamental shift in how the world deals with violent conflict: moving from reaction to prevention. In this Thursday Talk, Paul Kosterink presented on how the GPPAC uses Outcome Mapping to monitor and evaluate its own advocacy and lobbying of the UN.

Eight years ago GPPAC developed its M&E system based on Outcome Mapping.  Learning from practice, this M&E system was adapted and simplified in order to meet the needs of the network. Currently, the outcome reporting is done retrospectively and identifies which actors changed their behaviour and how GPPAC contributed to the reported changes.  Presently, the outcomes database is being used in its entirety for a soon to be finalized external evaluation.  Paul used these GPPAC experiences to demonstrate how an M&E system can be implemented to evaluate international lobbying and advocacy efforts by a global CSO network.  

 

Check back soon for the summary.

About the Speaker:

Paul Kosterink has served as the coordinator for Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning at GPPAC for the past three years. He has 25 years of experience working with and for CSOs to strengthen their capacities and to enable them to operate at the international levels. He is a practitioner in monitoring & evaluation and promotes the ‘learning’ from M&E processes. Paul is working at the Global Secretariat of GPPAC, based in The Netherlands. GPPAC has an own ‘liaison’ towards the UN, working from the premises of a partner organisation in New York. GPPAC has about 200 members (CSOs) world-wide.

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