Design, Monitoring and Evaluation for Peacebuilding

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Events

Restorative Justice: The Promise, The Challenge - training course

Date(s)
05/04/2015 to 05/12/2015
Organization
Summer Peacebuilding Institute
Location
Location
Contact Info
Contact Person
Director
+1 (540) 432-4295
Summer Peacebuilding Institute
William Goldberg
Description

The current criminal justice system focuses mainly on punishment of the offender.  In so doing, it marginalizes the victim, the community, and the families of both the victim and the offender.  In addition, it has pushed support networks for these key stakeholders outside of the system.

Restorative Justice focuses on repairing the harm and/or structural injustices caused or revealed by crime, violence or other wrongdoing. It seeks to involve those who have a stake in a specific offense (victim, offender, family networks, community, civil society, and institutional or state actors) to identify and address the harms, needs, and obligations of all involved in order to heal and reconstruct relationships and structures in society. Restorative Justice is built on values of respect, encounter, amends, reintegration and inclusion.

In Restorative Justice: The Promise, The Challenge (May 4 – 12, 2015), you will critically examine the fundamental principles and practices of restorative justice and experience a unique opportunity to explore both the promise and challenge to the restorative justice field in a variety of contexts. Explore the needs and roles of key stakeholders, outline the basic principles and values of restoration, and be introduced to some of the primary models of practice. The course also addresses the “challenges” to restorative justice from the current justice paradigm and some of the strategies to help prevent restorative justice from failing to live up to its promise.

The central starting point for the course is the Western legal (criminal justice) system and the problem of crime and public violence; however attention is also given to applications in and lessons from international contexts. Of particular interest is the contribution of traditional or indigenous approaches to justice.

For more information on this course and other courses being taught at the 2015 Summer Peacebuilding Institute, visit our website by clicking here.

To apply for this course or others, click here.

To read interviews with Dr. Howard Zehr, the “grandfather of Restorative Justice” or Dr. Carl Stauffer, assistant professor at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, on the past, present, and future of restorative justice, both in the criminal justice field and beyond, click on the following links:

Summer Peacebuilding Institute courses run from May 4 - June 12, 2015.

Please visit our website, contact us by e-mail at spi@emu.edu, or call us at 540-432-4295 for more information.

Registration Website: